TRMW *

#brands

(via iwdrm and DJ Food)

(via iwdrm and DJ Food)

Revisiting ESPRIT - Lined & Unlined

Revisiting ESPRIT - Lined & Unlined

Ninety Years of Refrigerators, and Logos - Brand New
What is saddest still is viewing the logo in color. The placement of the red triangle results in breaking the word Frigidaire into two separate words: Frigid and Ire. Given that these products are specifically marketed to moms, this messaging system is likely not going to appeal to anyone.
Not that I’m particularly invested in Frigidaire’s brand or anything, but yeah, poorly done.  Seems like mid-century is as chic as ever right now, so the timing on this is odd as well.  Also: FRIGID IRE.

Ninety Years of Refrigerators, and Logos - Brand New

What is saddest still is viewing the logo in color. The placement of the red triangle results in breaking the word Frigidaire into two separate words: Frigid and Ire. Given that these products are specifically marketed to moms, this messaging system is likely not going to appeal to anyone.

Not that I’m particularly invested in Frigidaire’s brand or anything, but yeah, poorly done.  Seems like mid-century is as chic as ever right now, so the timing on this is odd as well. Also: FRIGID IRE.

Greg Lamarche, Brand Recognition2008 Paper collage, 11 x 16 inches

Greg Lamarche, Brand Recognition
2008 Paper collage, 11 x 16 inches

javier jaén: The Rolling Stamp

javier jaén: The Rolling Stamp

“EBAY” by François Curlet. (via VVORK)

“EBAY” by François Curlet. (via VVORK)

the electric company : jtk

the electric company : jtk

My Boho Career

Simon Reynolds:

At one point living a bohemian life meant embracing failure, squandering the opportunities and privileges of your class background, a deliberate self-impoverishment that rejected the conventional ideas of wealth and success in favour of spiritual and aesthetic riches.

Now certain aspects of bohemianism—a life dedicated to aestheticism, exquisite sensations, “experiences”, the exotic; a systematic derangement of the senses; an unstructured and de-routinized lifestyle—have become compatible with an essentially affluent and careerist existence.

Very interesting points here. I’d say that change might have some connection to the rise of lifestyle marketing, and the fact being incredibly hip is now a marketable skill, and can feasibly lead to making buttloads of money. I seem to recall a story in this book in which a Williamsburg hipster sells the jeans he’s been wearing every day — without washing, for years — to Levi’s, so they can clone them. Strange times.