TRMW *

#design

Jessica Svendson (via but does it float)

saschalobe:

Typeclass of HfG, Katja Velkova, 2013

saschalobe:

Typeclass of HfG, Katja Velkova, 2013

Twenty Awesome Covers From The US Space Program

Twenty Awesome Covers From The US Space Program

Postcards from the new School of Life in Melbourne (via The Design Files)

Postcards from the new School of Life in Melbourne (via The Design Files)

Pretty clever stop-motion work from Part and Parcel. (via Design Envy)

(Source: b-u-i-l-d)

The great Milton Glaser on failure. Basically success can be limiting, and failure helps you learn. Watching this, and this documentary, Glaser seems to have attained a unique mix of playful curiosity, calm deliberation, emotional awareness, and a little bit of the rascal. I hope to be so cool (without caring at all about being cool, which is kind of the same thing) when I’m older.

Enjoying Museum Studio’s hyper-patterned identity for Marble, the new record label from ex-Institubes guys Surkin and Para One. Also, if you need some completely over-the-top, arena-sized, piano-banging dance music to start out your week, Marble can do that for you.

Enjoying Museum Studio’s hyper-patterned identity for Marble, the new record label from ex-Institubes guys Surkin and Para One. Also, if you need some completely over-the-top, arena-sized, piano-banging dance music to start out your week, Marble can do that for you.

Not super interested in reading Gladwell right now, but if I was, I would so buy these great-looking books. Designed by Brian Rea and Paul Sahre. Bigger images here.

Not super interested in reading Gladwell right now, but if I was, I would so buy these great-looking books. Designed by Brian Rea and Paul Sahre. Bigger images here.

Beautiful book design by Project Projects

Beautiful book design by Project Projects

Lovely poster by Ben Critton. Not quite sure what it is that makes this “work” for me, but it does.  It’s cluttered, but somehow balanced, and the colors are great. (via @pieratt)

Lovely poster by Ben Critton. Not quite sure what it is that makes this “work” for me, but it does.  It’s cluttered, but somehow balanced, and the colors are great. (via @pieratt)

Graphic design is a means, not and end. A language, not content.
Tibor Kalman, who also did content.
My own ambition is to write a song that sounds like I stole it — like ‘I’ didn’t write it, but it has always been there. To get the ‘I’ out the song is the ultimate compositional coup, whether in music or design.
David Byrne

In Praise of Kalmans

image

I spent a good chunk of today leafing through Tibor Kalman: Perverse Optimist at the San Francisco Public Library, Main Branch. The book is a retrospective on Kalman, a very clever designer-generalist-messenger who you may or may not know from his studio, M&Co, or the magazine he edited, Colors.

The book is out of print, and SFPL only has it at the reference desk, meaning you can’t take it home. Kalman himself passed away in 1999 after fighting cancer. I can walk to this library, but this was the first time I actually did in the three years I’ve lived in this apartment.

All of this lent the book a sense of totemic specialness. In this age of easy, instant information, here was something I had to hunt down, full of images and words I couldn’t find online. I haven’t had that feeling of guessing, anticipating what something might contain in a while. It was kind of refreshing.

The image above is the first one in the book, and it sums up a lot of what I love about Tibor Kalman’s work, and the work of his wife, Maira Kalman. I’ve become a big fan of Maira’s illustrated writings and designs over the last couple years, and she’s quickly become a very bright star in my personal universe of heroes. Their work is different, and I know hers better than his, but the things I love about this image and the statement it’s paired with can be found in both. It’s beautiful, bright, disorienting. And it’s confused. Confused in all the positive (excited, free, wild) and negative (lost, unmoored, anxious) senses of that word.

In this wonderful TED talk, Maira Kalman talks about how M&Co started with the idea that “We don’t know anything, but that’s alright.”  It’s a liberating stance, and a scary one — and it’s about a lot more than design. It’s punk, in the best sense of that word. The way kids are punk, and this 91-year-old woman is punk. It’s about feeling free to rip it up and start again, even if — maybe especially if — you’re not sure you ever really had it in the first place.