TRMW *

#photography

Koenig & Clinton — Sigmar Polke, Photoworks 1964–2000 (via void())

Koenig & Clinton — Sigmar Polke, Photoworks 1964–2000 (via void())

Your Wednesday Briefing - NYTimes.com

Iraqi women showed inked fingers after casting their ballots at a polling station in Baghdad.

This is an amazing photo.

Your Wednesday Briefing - NYTimes.com

Iraqi women showed inked fingers after casting their ballots at a polling station in Baghdad.

This is an amazing photo.

Gerco de Ruijter, Kite Perspectives (via kenfrederick)

Gerco de Ruijter, Kite Perspectives (via kenfrederick)

America in the 1970s: New York City - The Atlantic

America in the 1970s: New York City - The Atlantic

Camille Seaman (via but does it float)

Camille Seaman (via but does it float)

Leslie Williamson

Leslie Williamson

Charlotte Ballesteros and Hubert Marot (via but does it float)

Charlotte Ballesteros and Hubert Marot (via but does it float)

I recently finished making this website for my very talented photographer friend Dru Donovan.
I’ve always enjoyed simple, minimal designs, and with Dru, I finally got a chance to really go there with one of my own. The site is monochrome, showcasing a single portfolio for now, but with the ability to show more as time goes on.
The admin interface is probably what I’m most proud of — the part where Dru manages portfolios and such — but you’ll just have to take me on my word there since, you know, only admins allowed.
It was really fun working with a good friend who shares a similar aesthetic, and who’s work most certainly deserved showcasing.
Nerd notes: The site is built with Rails, and hosted by Heroku. There’s a little bit of jQuery going on in the portfolio navigation. Files are hosted on Amazon S3, via the stalwart Paperclip gem. Hooray for awesome tools that just work.

I recently finished making this website for my very talented photographer friend Dru Donovan.

I’ve always enjoyed simple, minimal designs, and with Dru, I finally got a chance to really go there with one of my own. The site is monochrome, showcasing a single portfolio for now, but with the ability to show more as time goes on.

The admin interface is probably what I’m most proud of — the part where Dru manages portfolios and such — but you’ll just have to take me on my word there since, you know, only admins allowed.

It was really fun working with a good friend who shares a similar aesthetic, and who’s work most certainly deserved showcasing.

Nerd notes: The site is built with Rails, and hosted by Heroku. There’s a little bit of jQuery going on in the portfolio navigation. Files are hosted on Amazon S3, via the stalwart Paperclip gem. Hooray for awesome tools that just work.

Weekend, Anthony Burrill

Weekend, Anthony Burrill

Unchanging Window

Unchanging Window

Jan Kempenaers, Spomenik #1, 2006 
BAM explains what we’re looking at:
In the context of his “Spomenik: The End of History” project, Kempenaers has photographed monuments erected by the communist regime of former Yugoslavia. Paying attention to their careful integration in the landscape, he demonstrates that landscapes are turned into sites of memory. Commemorating the common traumatic experiences during the Second World War and the partisan battles, these monuments were intended to provide the people of Yugoslavia with a common history and identity that would be productive in its future evolution. However, in the late twentieth century, these landscapes were torn by nationalist and ethnic violence and their monuments are now neglected. The idea of progress has been buried under the weight of history and the monuments, which were once machines of sightseeing and (photographic) image production, have become obsolete and invisible. Notwithstanding their futurist designs and their space age associations, these monuments have become modernist variations of the Romantic ruin - another preeminent icon of the picturesque.
More images at Hello You.

Jan Kempenaers, Spomenik #1, 2006 

BAM explains what we’re looking at:

In the context of his “Spomenik: The End of History” project, Kempenaers has photographed monuments erected by the communist regime of former Yugoslavia. Paying attention to their careful integration in the landscape, he demonstrates that landscapes are turned into sites of memory. Commemorating the common traumatic experiences during the Second World War and the partisan battles, these monuments were intended to provide the people of Yugoslavia with a common history and identity that would be productive in its future evolution. However, in the late twentieth century, these landscapes were torn by nationalist and ethnic violence and their monuments are now neglected. The idea of progress has been buried under the weight of history and the monuments, which were once machines of sightseeing and (photographic) image production, have become obsolete and invisible. Notwithstanding their futurist designs and their space age associations, these monuments have become modernist variations of the Romantic ruin - another preeminent icon of the picturesque.

More images at Hello You.

Chris Glass » Graceland
Some really nice photos of, you guessed it, Graceland.

Chris Glass » Graceland

Some really nice photos of, you guessed it, Graceland.

Chris Glass » an afternoon walking around downtown
(via Daring Fireball)

Chris Glass » an afternoon walking around downtown

(via Daring Fireball)